City of London Cemetery

Wildlife recorded in the City of London Cemetery

Birds, Insects, Mammals

For Plants click here

 

Birds

The cemetery, in its location adjacent to so many other wildlife areas and its wealth of planted vegetation, means that a good variety of birds - albeit many of the "garden" varieties - are usually present. In this list only those species that have been seen in the cemetery, or are commonly seen overhead, have been included, and not those that may casually pass overhead. Those in ordinary font are thought to be usually present (in their season), those in italics rare or visitors, and those in bold may breed.

 

BIRDS
Grey Heron May be seen flying over, and occasionally visit the ponds - which contain some tasty fish!
Mallard Occasional in the ponds
Sparrowhawk Can sometimes be seen overhead, or hunting through the trees
Hobby Occasional
Kestrel Can sometimes be seen overhead,
Common Gull Frequently seen overhead
Wood Pigeon Common
Feral Pigeon Uncommon
Collared Dove Fairly Common
Tawny Owl Uncommon, but may be heard in the cemetery
Swift A common summer sight
Green Woodpecker Quite common
Great Spotted Woodpecker Quite common
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker Uncommon - not recorded for some years
Swallow Passage in Spring and Autumn with some during the Summer
House Martin Much less common now
Pied Wagtail Uncommon
Wren Common
Dunnock Common
Blackcap Fairly common
Willow Warbler Uncommon
Chiffchaff Fairly Common
Goldcrest Uncommon
Robin Common
Fieldfare Sometimes seen in Winter
Blackbird Common
Redwing Sometimes seen in Winter
Song Thrush Often seen and heard
Mistle Thrush Fairly Common
Long-tailed Tit Common
Coal Tit Uncommon - but in2009/10 one of the better places in the general area to see this species
Blue Tit Common
Great Tit Common
Chaffinch Common
Greenfinch Common
Goldfinch Quite common, particularly in winter
Bullfinch Very uncommon
House Sparrow Uncommon - but increasing
Starling Common
Jay Common
Magpie Common
Carrion Crow Common
Ring-necked Parakeet One reported on 23 November 2005, but in 2010 increasingly heard flying over

 

Insects


About 20 species of Butterfly have been seen here, and many moths. Other insects include a variety of Grasshoppers and Crickets including Roesel's Bush Cricket Metrioptera roeselii. Some of the insects recorded are listed below.

 

BUTTERFLIES
Large Skipper Ochlodes venatus
Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola
Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris
Common Blue Polyommatus icarus
Large White Pieris brassicae
Green-veined White Pieris napi
Meadow Brown Maniola jurtina
Red Admiral Vanessa atalanta
Small Copper Lycaena phlaeas
Small Heath Coenonympha pamhilus
Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae
Small White Artogeia rapae
Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria
Peacock Inachis io
Comma Polygonia c-album
MOTHS
Cinnabar Tyria jacobaeae
Grass Moths
DRAGONFLIES and DAMSELFLIES
Common Darter Sympetrum striolatum
Common Blue Damselfly Polyommatus icarus
Azure Damselfly Coenagrion puella
GRASSHOPPERS and CRICKETS
Roesel's Bush-cricket Metrioptera roeselii
Meadow Grasshopper Chorthippus parallelus
Common Green Grasshopper Omocestulus viridulus
Common Field Grasshopper Chorthippus brunneus
Long winged cone-head Conocephalus dorsalis
OTHER INSECTS AND SPIDERS
awaiting information

 

Mammals

 

MAMMALS
Hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus Rarely encountered these days
Mole Talpa europaea Mole hills are often seen, particularly in the soft soils on the Roding embankments
Shrew Sorex araneus Can sometimes be heard in the rougher grassland
Fox Vulpes vulpes A very common resident, and very "tame" in the neighbourhood of the cafeteria
Squirrel Sciuris caroliensis Vey common

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Hunter Memorial

Robert Hunter was born in Newburgh, Fifeshire and died at Loughton in 1897. He was lexicographer, a missionary, a geologist, and a naturalist in Aberdeen, Nagpore, Victoria Docks, Sewardstone, and Loughton. (source: RHS Bibliography).

Scottish cleric and naturalist. Worked in the Bermuda Islands and central India 1847-1855, and discovered two new minerals, hislopite and hunterite. (source: Natural History Museum)

In 1882 Hunter built his house, Forest Retreat, in Staples Road, Loughton. There is a Blue Plaque on the house - now called Forest Villa - placed by Loughton Town Council on 23 February 1997 for the centenary of his death. The inscription reads: "The Rev. Robert Hunter (1823-1897) Lexicographer and Naturalist lived here". The monument states that he died at Forest Retreat on 25th February 1897.

Robert Hunter Memorial

Photo and text: Paul Ferris 15/03/2008

Fungi in the City of London Cemetery

 

No.
Scientific Name
Common Name
Location
1
Agaricus arvensis Horse Mushroom
2
Agaricus campestris Field Mushroom
3
Agaricus sylvaticus Wood Mushroom
4
Agaricus xanthoderma Yellow Stainer
5
Agrocybe praecox Spring Agaric
6
Aleuria aurantia Orange-peel Fungus
7
Amanita excelsa
8
Amanita muscaria Fly Agaric
9
Amanita rubescens The Blusher
10
Armillaria mellea agg. Honey Fungus
11
Auricularia auricula-judae Jew's ear
12
Boletus badius Bay Boletus
13
Boletus chrysenteron Red-cracked Boletus
14
Boletus edulis Cep or Penny Bun
15
Boletus erythropus
16
Boletus scaber
17
Boletus subtomentosus Downy Bolete
18
Chondrostereum purpureum Silver-leaf Fungus
19
Clavulina fusiformus Golden Spindles
20
Clavulina rugosa Wrinkled Club
21
Clavulinopsis helvola
22
Clavulinopsis luteo-alba
23
Clitocybe dealbata
24
Clitocybe flaccida Tawney Funnel-cap
25
Clitocybe infundibuliformis Common Funnel-cap
26
Clitocybe nebularis Clouded Funnel-cap
27
Collybia dryophila
28
Collybia erythropus
29
Collybia peronata Wood Woolly-foot
30
Coprinus atramentarius Ink Cap
31
Coprinus comatus Lawyer's Wig
32
Coprinus micaceus Glistening Ink Cap
33
Coriolus versicolor Many-zoned Polypore
34
Coryne sarcoides
35
Cystoderma amianthinum
36
Dacrymyces deliquescens
37
Daedaleopsis confragosa Blushing Bracket
38
Entoloma rhadopolium
39
Entoloma saundersii ?
40
Flammulina velutipes Velvet Foot
41
Ganoderma adspersum Bracket
42
Ganoderma lucidum Bracket
43
Gymnopilus junonius
43
Hygrocybe ceracea
45
Hygrocybe marchii
46
Hygrocybe nigrescens Blackening Wax-cap
47
Hygrocybe pratensis Meadow Wax-cap
48
Hygrocybe psittacina Parrot Wax-cap
49
Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca False Chanterelle
50
Hypholoma fasciculare Sulphur Tuft
51
Laccaria laccata Deceiver
52
Lacrymaria velutina Weeping Widow
53
Lactarius rufus Red Milk-cap
54
Lactarius turpis Ugly Milk-cap
55
Laetiporus sulphureus Chicken of the Woods
56
Langermannia gigantea Giant Puff-ball
57
Lepiota cristata Stinking Parasol
58
Lepiota konradii
59
Lepiota procera Parasol
60
Lepiota rhacodes Shaggy Parasol
61
Lepista nuda Wood Blewit
62
Leptonia sericella
63
Lycoperdon perlatum Puffball
64
Lycoperdon pyriforme Stump Puffball
65
Marasmius androsaceus Horse-hair Fungus
66
Marasmius oreades Fairy Ring Champignon
67
Meripilus giganteus Giant Polypore
68
Mycena aetites
69
Mycena alcalina
70
Mycena epipterygia
71
Mycena fibula
72
Mycena flavo-alba
73
Mycena leptocephala
74
Mycena olivaceomarginata
75
Mycena polygramma
76
Mycena swartzii
77
Nectria cinnabarina Coral-spot
78
Nolanea farinolens
79
Paxillus involutus Brown Roll-rim
80
Pholiota lenta?

81

Pholiota squarrosa Shaggy Pholiota
82
Piptoporus betulinus Birch Polypore
83
Pleurotus ostreatus Oyster Mushroom
84
Polyporus squamosus Dryad's Saddle
85
Psathyrella candolleana Crumble Cap
86
Psathyrella microrhiza
87
Pseudotrametes gibbosa Bracket
88
Russula atropurpurea Black Purple Russula
89
Russula cyanoxantha The Charcoal Burner
90
Russula nigricans Blackening Russula
91
Russula ochroleuca Common Ochre Russula
92
Russula sororia
93
Stereum guasapatum
94
Suillus grevellei
95
Tricholoma gambosum St. George's Mushroom
96
Tubaria furfuracea
97
Xylaria hypoxylon Candle-snuff fungus

 

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Plan of the City of London Cemetery at Little Ilford in the County of Essex - 1856

Old Plan of the City of London CemeteryOld Plan of the City of London Cemetery

 

Recording Map showing the City of London Cemetery and the Alders Brook

The grid squares are used for wildlife recording purposes.

Map of City of London Cemetery